Basin Taps

The right taps can add a smart detail to your bathroom which can enhance the way that you use it, and features that make your taps easier to use or those which help to extend the life of your taps are always a bonus. There are a wide range of manufacturers, styles and finishes to choose from, so it is easy to find something to compliment other elements in your bathroom, from towel rails and toilet roll holders to shelves and other accessories. With basin taps, the number of tap holes in your basin will determine the type of taps you can use.

 

Having one tap hole offers the choice between monobloc mixer and single lever mixer taps. As the name suggests, single lever taps use a lever to control the flow of both hot and cold water from a single spout. This lever is normally located on the top with up and down controlling the flow and left & right controlling the temperature.

 

Monobloc taps also have just one spout, but with two handles to control the balance of hot and cold water. If you are worried about hitting your head on the spout, you can also get models with a swivel spout to rotate it out of the way of the bowl.

 

If you have two tap holes you’ll need to choose pillar taps. These are available in a large variety of styles with knob, lever and cross shaped handles and independently control the flow of hot and cold water. Pillar taps tend to come in more traditional styles but some more contemporary styles are available.

 

Three tap hole basins will use a separate spout in the middle hole (sometimes with a pop-up waste control knob on the top) and a hot and cold handle on the left and right holes. These can be modern or traditional styles and 3 tap hole basins are more rare to find.

 

No tap hole basins will require either a wall mounted mixer where the tap is installed into the wall with  a control lever or two and a spout reaching out to the bowl. There is a brass body that needs plumbing into the wall so it is easier to do on stud walls. The alternative would be a freestanding tap alongside the basin where you can even get longstanding ones. 

 

Do keep an eye on the minimum water pressure requirements as you will find that some need a high pressure to work. If you live in a hard water area (and don't have a water softener) then a waterfall style spout might not be the best idea as the limescale will require constant cleaning. The same thing can be said for the matt black finish.

Bath Taps

With bath taps, whether you are updating an existing bath or adding a new one, you also need to consider the number you tap holes. Most Acrylic (plastic) baths don’t come with the holes pre-drilled unless you request it, so you can choose any model of tap you like, but make sure to check the product information. Steel bath tubs are usually ordered with the tap holes pre-drilled as it is more difficult material to cut.  There are plenty of different finishes, styles and combinations of bath taps available. 

 

With one tap hole you have the option of a monobloc or single-lever tap. Like a basin, the flow of water will be controlled by one or two handles and fill from a single spout.

 

If you have or prefer two tap holes, you can choose between pillar and mixer taps. Pillar taps work in the same way as they do on a basin, whereas mixer taps control the hot and cold water separately but mix together then fill from a single spout. When using a mixer tap, it’s common to have a diverter which allows you to send the flow of water through an attached shower hose offering more flexibility for bathing and cleaning. You can have multiple holes as some ranges have the tap split in up to 5 deck mounted modules usually with pull out handsets.

 

Wall mounted taps have a modern sleek look and are a good alternative if you do not have much space on you bath rim or if you have chosen a free-standing bath. There are many different styles, including cross handles with a spout to a manual valve with a waterfall. Wall mounting does require a bit more planning than other options, for example making sure you choose a bath without pre-drilled holes, but the results are worth the effort. A popular filling option is a exofill / overflow filler which is where the top part of a bath waste is not only an overflow hole but also a subtle spout where the water flows out of the bottom. These require a control which can be a wall mounted valve or separate hot & cold control knobs.

 

For freestanding baths you can also use a tall freestanding bath filler or bath shower mixer (with handset) which is floor mounted. 

 

Do keep an eye on the minimum water pressure requirements as you will find that some need a high pressure to work. If you live in a hard water area (and don't have a water softener) then a waterfall style spout might not be the best idea as the limescale will require constant cleaning. The same thing can be said for the matt black finish.

 

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